The Arts and Science Museum, Art of the Brick Quest

Returning to the beginning of the semester, when I first ventured to Marina Bay (and finally ceased being agasp at the ostentatious nature of the legendary Marina Bay Sands), I noticed sculptural advertisements for The Art of the Brick Lego exhibit at the Arts and Science Museum and vowed that one day, before the end of the exhibit, I would return to Marina Bay and experience the Lego-themed museum epic for myself.

The call of the Lego-polar bear is not one to be ignored!

The call of the Lego-polar bear is not one to be ignored!

In the moons to come, I was able to gain significant knowledge into the sustainability efforts of the Arts and Science Museum, discovering that the distinct lotus shape of the building was specially selected in order to act as a rain-catching basin, so that rainwater may be collected, filtered and re-circulated throughout the building’s facilities. However, this was only by a fortunate coincidence whereby another educational quest required me to research the Marina Bay Sands Hotel (which is the proprietor of the Arts and Science Museum).

As design is not exclusively for vanity

As design is not exclusively for vanity

As such, the status of the actual museum-frequenting vow grew increasingly meek; my excursion-ing interests shifted away from Singapore and towards “more exotic” destinations and thoughts of my mission were often void in my mind.

Fortunately, my noble code of “sure, why not?” kept me on the path of justice during a period when a fellow compatriot revealed they had taken a similar vow and planned to fulfil it that eve. I found myself agreeing to act as their accompaniment, and was soon partaking on a voyage to The Arts and Science Museum.

My quest had not finished challenging me, as I was swiftly distracted me the blooming flora growing outside the museum. After squandering precious potential exhibit-touring moments, I re-focused on my mission, and pressed onward.

Yes,

While water lilies are indubitably beauteous… 

...They are presently nothing but a shameless distraction!

…They are presently nothing but a shameless distraction!

Upon completing my entry-quest, I was soon encountered with a follow-up mission: constructing a water-droplet of comparable quality to those of the artist-on-display, Nathan Sawaya. Although his works were of considerable quality, my comrade and I persevered through several logistical challenges (alas, there was no instruction manual to be provided!) and were able to produce a notable replica.

The trials of our noble mission!

The trials of our noble mission!

Upon completing not one, but two noble missions, piece and balance had been restored to the natural universe.

(As exhibited in the following print)

Mission completed and piece restored to the world!

As such, I was able to enjoy utilizing my photographic capabilities to (attempt to) capture the excursion, and share it with thou on this occasion.

IMG_6770

Reflecting on my recent triumphs with my Lego counterpart

Reflecting on my recent triumphs with my Lego counterpart

Taking an obligatory butt-photo

Obligatory butt-photo

Re-experiencing past quests at the Royal Tyrell Museum

Re-experiencing past quests at the Royal Tyrell Museum from the dinosaur capital of Canada

IMG_6812

Feeding off the energy of my two mission, I attempted a third and final quest: to venture through the “reflexology” Lego demonstration. This consisted of walking across an uneven Lego surface. Those familiar with the unforgiving blocks will understand the consequences of attempting such a mission and failing. For those who remain blissfully unaware, the following caption explains the scenario:

images (1)

Thankfully, I was able to leverage my years of Lego-building knowledge to safely (and painlessly) complete the path.

Facing off for my challenge

Facing off for my final challenge

 

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