Wine-ing Around Kelowna’s Vineyards

It’s a well-known rule that anyone who takes a trip to Kelowna has to visit at least 4 wineries before they’re allowed to leave. Since I had plans to move out to (spoiler alert:) Whistler, I was faced with the difficult task of choosing which of Kelowna’s 30 wineries I wanted to tour. Luckily, I made my decision by teaming up with HelloBC again to write an article about sustainable wineries, which led me to Kalala Organic Estate WineryTantalus Vineyards and Summerhill Pyramid Winery.

To match with the “sustainability” theme, I also decided that I would cycle to each of these locations.

 A decision I made before putting 2 and 2 together to realize that while mountain slopes are pretty, they also make for an intense workout

A decision I made before putting 2 and 2 together to realize that while mountain slopes are pretty, they also make for an intense workout

Panting my way up and down rolling hillsides only made views (and tastes) at each destination all the more sweet (or savoury, depending on the type of wine) though.

As the only LEED-certified winery building in the Okanagan, I didn’t want to dishonour Tantalus’ wine shop by showing up in a hummer or something crazy

As the only LEED-certified winery building in the Okanagan, I didn’t want to dishonour Tantalus’ wine shop by showing up in a hummer or something crazy

In addition to getting to taste some great wines, I also learned a thing or two about the stuff to help me pretend like I know what I’m talking about when wine comes up in conversation. Since I’m such a nice person, I’ll help you pretend you know all about sustainable Okanagan wine with these 3 quick facts:

1)    If grapes are grown organically, the soil around the vines will be covered with weeds (If they’re not organic and sprayed with pesticides, nothing will be able to grow there)

IMG_1243

2)    Chardonnay, Riesling and Pinot Noir will typically be the best types of wines to order from the Okanagan

If that can help lower down the selection at all

If that can help lower down the selection at all

3)    Organic wines can only have 100 sulphur dioxide (SO2) parts per million, instead of 350, like in non-organic wines

Since that was a lot of learning, I decided I’d finish up with a nice tour and tasting at Quail’s Gate and lunch at the restaurant, Old Vines. Coming in, I was pretty sure the wine was going to be fantastic.

Which was confirmed by a taste-test

Which was confirmed by a taste-test

However, I was completely blown away by the food at Old Vines and decided to take photos of all of my party’s courses:

To start: Dungeness crab cakes, warm beets and buffalo mozzarella salad & green apple, orange and arugula salad

To start: Dungeness crab cakes, warm beets and buffalo mozzarella salad & green apple, orange and arugula salad

For mains: grilled wild BC salmon, prosciutto wrapped Maple hills chicken breast and Cache creek natural beef butchers’ cut

For mains: grilled wild BC salmon, prosciutto wrapped Maple hills chicken breast and Cache creek natural beef butchers’ cut

To finish off: salted caramel budino and chocolate crèmeux

To finish off: salted caramel budino and chocolate crèmeux

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4 thoughts on “Wine-ing Around Kelowna’s Vineyards

  1. Pingback: College Tourist Global Writer's Roundup | The College Tourist

  2. Pingback: Dining Around The Culinary Capital of Kelowna (A Travvelsized Odyssey) | Twice as much in half the space

  3. Pingback: Dining Around The Culinary Capital of Kelowna (A Travvelsized Odyssey) | Twice as much in half the space

  4. Pingback: College Tourist Global Writer’s Roundup | The College Tourist

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